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Mangion Walker murder | Ex-husband was suicidal for a week after arrest, court told

Duty psychiatrist had suggested Andrew Mangion be detained in an isolation ward as he feared the man would try to harm himself

matthew_agius
Matthew Agius
9 January 2017, 3:27pm
Andrew Mangion had shown particular concern for his daughter as he had no idea as to her whereabouts, the psychiatrist said
Andrew Mangion had shown particular concern for his daughter as he had no idea as to her whereabouts, the psychiatrist said
The compilation of evidence against murder suspect Andrew Mangion has continued this afternoon with a psychiatrist testifying that the accused had appeared willing to harm himself at the time of his arrest, but that his suicidal ideation had subsided after just under a week.

Mangion is accused of the murder of his estranged wife, Eleanor Mangion Walker, whose body was found in a warehouse in Qormi in July last year. In previous sittings, the court had been told that it was likely that the woman had been murdered in a garage in Swieqi before her body was transported to the Qormi warehouse.

Psychiatrist Joe Vella Baldacchino told magistrate Doreen Clarke that he had been duty psychiatrist at the time of Mangion's arrest. He had examined Mangion and suggested that he be detained in an isolation ward as he feared the man would try to harm himself. “He looked very sad, worried and often in tears,” he told the court.

Vella Baldacchino said Mangion had shown particular concern for his daughter as he had no idea as to her whereabouts. He had visited the accused six days after his admission to the isolation unit at Mount Carmel hospital, he said. Mangion had stopped taking his medication and appeared much more composed.

The psychiatrist declared the accused to be mentally sound enough to undergo interrogation, which Mangion had then accepted to undergo.

Other witnesses told the court today that police had carried out searches in three different houses, in different towns. A police officer testified that this was necessary because the accused - who worked as a handyman - had been found to possess a set of keys to these properties, as he had been carrying out maintenance in them.

Inspectors Kylie Borg and Keith Arnaud prosecuting, whilst lawyers Michael and Lucio Sciriha are appearing in parte civile for the victim's family. Andrew Mangion is being defended by lawyer Joe Giglio.

The case continues in next month.

matthew_agius
Court reporter Matthew Agius is a Legal Procurator and Commissioner for Oaths. Prior to re...
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