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Price of electricity in the EU: Malta below EU average in 2013

Household electricity prices in the EU28 rose by 2.8%

21 May 2014, 12:06pm
Malta’s electricity prices were less than the EU average in the second half of 2013, according to data issued by Eurostat.

In the EU28, household electricity prices rose by 2.8% on average between the second half of 2012 and the second half of 2013, after an increase of 6.0% between the second half of 2011 and 2012.

Electricity prices refer to prices for a household with an annual consumption of between 2,500 and 5,000 kWh, and include taxes. These prices are weighted by national household consumption to give the EU averages.

Between the second half of 2012 and the second half of 2013, the highest increases in household electricity prices in national currency were registered in Estonia (+22%), Greece (+20%), Romania (+17%), France and Lithuania (both +10%).

The highest decreases were observed in Cyprus (-15%), Hungary (-14%), Spain (-9%) and Bulgaria (-8%), while prices remained stable or nearly stable in Latvia, Malta and Finland.

Expressed in euro, average household electricity prices in the second half of 2013 were lowest in Bulgaria (€8.8 per 100 kWh), Romania (€12.8) and Hungary (€13.3) and highest in Denmark (€29.4), Germany (€29.2) Cyprus (€24.8) and Ireland (€24.1). The average electricity price in the EU28 was €20.1 per 100 kWh.

When expressed in purchasing power standards (PPS), an artificial common reference currency that eliminates general price level differences between countries, it can be seen that, relative to the cost of other goods and services, the lowest household electricity prices were found in Finland (12.8 PPS per 100 kWh), Luxembourg (13.7), Latvia (14.0) and France (14.1), and the highest in Cyprus (28.2), Germany (28.1), Portugal (26.2) and Romania (25.9).