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FAA calls for preservation of heritage houses in Sliema

NGO asks Planning Authority to safeguard heritage house in Cathedral Street, currently at risk of being demolished

massimo_costa
Massimo Costa
20 November 2017, 1:17pm
The FAA is calling on the Planning Authority to safeguard stately buildings in Cathedral Street, including house number 33 (pictured), which could be demolished
The FAA is calling on the Planning Authority to safeguard stately buildings in Cathedral Street, including house number 33 (pictured), which could be demolished
A number of stately houses in Cathedral Street, Sliema, which forms part of the Urban Conservation Area, have been formally requested to be scheduled by environmental NGO Flimkien ghal Ambjent Ahjar.

The NGO said that one of the house, number 33, which is in the heart of the properties, is currently facing being demolished, pending an application to turn it into a block of flats.

The approval of this application would result in the loss of a heritage building, and also lead to the equally valuable properties in its immediate area, which give the street’s its rich architectural and historical past, being ruined, the FAA maintained.

The FAA said that it had also previously requested an Emergency Conservation order for this site, which was never acknowledged or acted upon.

It is thus requesting to Planning Authority to undertake all that is necessary to preserve the row of heritage houses and safeguard Sliema’s urban centre.

The Planning Authority have since confirmed that it is in the process of assessing a number of properties around the locality of Sliema which merit scheduling.

The process for their scheduling involves detailed consultations with the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage. To minimise the risk of any possible attempt to damage the properties, it is standard practice for the Authority to disclose the address of the properties only after they get officially scheduled as required by law.

The law also obliges the Planning Authority to publish the scheduling in the Government Gazette and to inform any one of the known owners about the scheduling who have 30 days from receipt of the notification, or where unknown to fix a site notice.  

The Authority uses the planning tool of scheduling to legally protect properties which are deemed to contain heritage significance. The full list of properties which are scheduled may be viewed from the online register that the Authority has on its website www.pa.org.mt.
 

massimo_costa
Massimo Costa joined MaltaToday in 2017 as a journalist. He is a graduate in European Stud...