Our country and its land – what future?

Social and economic progress has caused our workforce to abandon their traditional ties with the production of agricultural products

2 September 2016, 9:38am
Nobody today has the will, the time and the need to till the land as it had been the case before
Nobody today has the will, the time and the need to till the land as it had been the case before
I am a fervent follower of anything that happens daily on these beautiful islands of ours.

Non-government organisations should be commended for defending our national heritage and the general environment of our country. I am using these two terms “heritage” and “environment” in their widest meaning possible.

One needs also to look into the future, not by remaining dogmatic about tradition but by making use of intelligent cross-fertilization of ideas to give our country the direction for our future generations to enjoy.

I see the general feeling one reads about ad nauseam in the media as being too pessimistic, just like dogma religions.

In my view, the discussion, if it is to be of any value for recent and long term future generations, should be a proper one devoid of emotions and hidden agendas. There is so much to improve around us than just criticising anything to do with the explosive term “Outside Development Zones”; as if the “rape of the countryside” has happened just in the recent decades.

The truth is that social and economic progress has caused our workforce to abandon their traditional ties with the production of agricultural products and nobody today has the will, the time and the need to till the land as it had been the case in the not too distant past. I urge the NGOs to debate how stretches of private agricultural land can be put to better use for future generations without denying the right of the owners to enjoy the benefits of their rightfully owned property in the countryside.

The second point I wish to bring awareness to is about high-rise buildings. The Department of Architecture of the University of Malta has made massive progress over the years to remain progressive and in line with what happens elsewhere in the world. One objective of this branch of our mecca of studies challenges the students to come up with creative ideas.

The scope of it is of course to create a symbol of modern contemporary architectural design that should have made proud the present generation that we are, and a landmark for future Maltese generations. I am sure NGOs understand this message. It is with deep regrets to have to say that their pessimism is leading this country to remain backward. If a modern design is by a local, the design must be censored and heavily criticised. If the design is a by a foreigner, it becomes a building monument. NGOs should be more proactive and less destructive in their very important role to influence “positively” local cultural and social development.

Anthony Borg
St Julian’s