Excavations proposed in archeological site in San Gwann

The development was approved in what was one of the last rural enclaves in San Gwann, despite objections by environmental NGO Flimkien Ghal Ambjent Ahjar

The development was approved in what was one of the last rural enclaves in San Gwann
The development was approved in what was one of the last rural enclaves in San Gwann

The Superintendence for Cultural Heritage and the Archeological Society of Malta are objecting to rock cutting in Triq Zbibu in San Gwann, in an area which contains cart ruts where two years ago the Planning Authority issued a permit for 54 flats instead of an old farmhouse on condition that the archeological remains are not touched.

The development was approved in what was one of the last rural enclaves in San Gwann, despite objections by environmental NGO Flimkien Ghal Ambjent Ahjar.

Kappara Heights Limited is now proposing the widening of Sqaq Zbibu and the demolition of part of an old rubble wall as originally proposed by the developer in the application.  

The Mensija cart ruts, which are 72 metres away from the ones at Sqaq Zbibu, are classified as a Class B national monument
The Mensija cart ruts, which are 72 metres away from the ones at Sqaq Zbibu, are classified as a Class B national monument

The application foresees rock cutting to widen the street, the creation of parking spaces and more rock cutting to create a pathway. The developers are also proposing a landscaped “public open space” in the area following the removal of a wall. The embellishment works will include benches and an information panel about the archeological site. 

The Mensija cart ruts, which are 72 metres away from the ones at Sqaq Zbibu, are classified as a Class B national monument. 

The development involves extensive rock cutting to create parking spaces and improve accessibility to the development approved in 2014.

While noting that the application is aimed at creating “a better presentation of the archeological remains in the new urban context”, the Superintendence insists that this aim can still be achieved without resorting to any rock cutting.

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