Repatriating failed asylum seekers

Failed asylum seekers have no right to stay in Malta – but we must weigh the humanitarian nature of each case before repatriating them.

In many cases, the Maltese government failed to effect an instant removel of failed asylum seekers and in the meantime they have now created new bonds in Malta.
In many cases, the Maltese government failed to effect an instant removel of failed asylum seekers and in the meantime they have now created new bonds in Malta.

The government is rightly seeking EU aid to repatriate failed asylum seekers - people whose claim of asylum has been refused, even on appeal. The asylum system has clear criteria, which have to be respected. The simple and cruel truth is that hunger and misery alone does not make you eligible for protection.

Therefore, the immediate expulsion of people who are refused asylum is necessary for the system to function and to be respected by society at large.

The problem is what to do with people whose claims have been rejected not now, but a number of years ago.

The government claims that there are around 1,000 people living in Malta who had their asylum status rejected by the competent bodies. 

It is not clear how many of these are still living in Malta (for probably many have left Malta) and for how long they have been living here. It is not clear how many of these have been granted protection simply because they have been living here for a number of years.

These people have exercised their right according to international law to seek asylum.  They should not be considered as criminals. In many cases it was the Maltese state which allowed them to stay here, simply because either the state could not afford to send them back or because it had no idea where to send them. But time has not stood still for these people. These people have grown up, created bonds and probably even contributed to our economy by working here.

One can say that the fact that they have lost their asylum claim means that the state can legally send them back any time. But the reality is more complex than that. 

Neither does this absolve us from our humanitarian duties towards these people.

First of all one has to check for how long these people have been living here. Has the situation in their country changed in any way that affects their safety if they are sent back? Do we even know from which country they hail in the first place and if that is the case where are we going to send them back? Have these people formed human bonds while living here and do they have families and children? Should we separate these families or contemplate expelling minors?

Moreover how is the government planning to trace these people? Rounding up immigrant communities to single out failed asylum seekers could be a very messy process, which should surely be avoided.

Surely there are no simple answers to these questions, which can only be answered if each case is treated with the sensitivity it deserves. 

In far less sensitive matters our country can be very lenient towards crude fiscal or planning illegality. A few examples may suffice; the sanctioning of illegal development by our planning authority and the fact that the present budget contemplates yet another repatriation of funds scheme for tax evaders.

When it comes to human lives the stakes are much higher than in planning and tax evasion. A one-time amnesty for people who have lived here for say more than five years should be considered to bring these people within the law before we embark on a mass expulsion of people. Alternatively a legally constituted board should review the case of each individual before failed asylum seekers are sent back. 

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I suppose Cecilia Malstromm must be aware of the situation mentioned above. Therefore what directives does Malta have from the EU ? If as the article states, those who fail still stay in Malta then why on earth go with the procedure ? It's a waste of time, money and energy. In order to have a procedure there must be a solution to have a system working.
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Ask yourselves. Why don't they go to Saudi Arabia and other similar counties which are awash with oiL? Because there they have to WORK for their living and they get nothing unlike here where they get everything for free courtesy of US MALTESE TAXPAYERS. Sorry James, but they have NO place here. You may wish to join them when they are forcefully sent back. I am sure that you will be at home with them in their own countries.
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il poplu malti ghad jiddiespjacieh dawn in nies li memx posthom hawn malta tiga hawn kolonji zghar kullumkien malta u ghawdex hafna minhom ghandhom it tfal u mhux wiehed imma tnejn u tlieta ghamlu it tfal biex tibqaw hawn biex hadd ma ikecciehom il karita mid dar tibda
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@always hoping. I guess you migrated to the country settled by convicts in colonial times and gave and still give the natives a hard time. A country that can fit the whole of europe but has the population of a fraction of it. Remember the time they refused legal migration to people with curly hair even thou of Caucasian origin
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hallina james..... we dont want malta to lose its identity like the rest of europe where the people are foreigners in their home country.
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James if only those who are so keen in favour had the experience I had when living abroad as a legal emigrant, I had my passage payed partly by the government and the colonial office and a small fraction I payed. I am saying this because the minute I landed I was seen as: 'another one of those' 'a displaced person' a 'theygo' 'a wonnabe'. This I am saying because this small rock is my home and the place were I can move freely. Whole areas have been taken by foreigners and I dare say almost out of bound for us. If we continue at this rate we are going to be a roaming race in our own little island.Someone said the more they come the merrier, well, until they become in the majority then it will be too late.
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"The problem is what to do with people whose claims have been rejected not now, but a number of years ago." Whose fault is it James? Should Malta keep bearing the burden because the EU and our previous government seemed happy with the status quo that existed? No if there are those who failed to prove they should get asylum their holiday is over and should go back home and have a life.This might sound harsh, but just go to USA yourself, unable to prove that you can support yourself while there you won't even make it through the airport arrivals even though you go there legitimately. We are not dealing with charity but with people who do not want work and make their own country better.
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Why is it that a 'mass' of failed asylum seekers are presently living in Malta? Yes living in Malta on an island 14 miles by seven miles with no resources and where 65,000 people are living below the poverty line? Why is it that our hospitals can't cope, our deficits and standard of living is going down? Why is it that on this tiny barren island one finds thousands of illegals living here: yellow, white, blonds, yellow,blacks, and the police do not seem to care? Try to live illegally in the US or Australia or Sweden for that matter, they will chuck you out with no questions asked.Malta hanina: kulhadd jitnej.k bina?
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Can you please make up your mind ,Mr.Know-it-all Debono ? You were always one of the most vociferous in opposing govt when they were trying to effect an instant removal of failed asylum seekers !!!
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Can you please make up your mind ,Mr.Know-it-all Debono ? You were always one of the most vociferous in opposing govt when they were trying to effect an instant removal of failed asylum seekers !!!