Theresa May's reshuffle: who's in, who's out, and what didn't change

Theresa May's cabinet reshuffle was thrown off-course yesterday when senior members refused to move and Justine Greening quit the government

Theresa May poses outside Downing Street with Brandon Lewis (left), new Conservative party chairman and minister without portfolio, and James Cleverly, deputy chairman (Photo: The Guardian)
Theresa May poses outside Downing Street with Brandon Lewis (left), new Conservative party chairman and minister without portfolio, and James Cleverly, deputy chairman (Photo: The Guardian)

Theresa May’s cabinet reshuffle was thrown off-course yesterday, when senior members refused to move and Justine Greening quit after turning down a job as work and pensions secretary.

Education Secretary Justine Greening dramatically quit the government when May tried to move her to the Department of Work and Pensions.

Greening because educational secretary after Theresa May took over as prime minister in 2016. She spent more than two hours before refusing the role.

“Justine was offered DWP but declined to take it. The prime minister is disappointed but respects her decision to leave government,” a government source said.

Justine Greening quit when May tried to move her to the Department of Work and Pensions
Justine Greening quit when May tried to move her to the Department of Work and Pensions

In her resignation statement she said: "Social mobility matters to me and our country more than a ministerial career.

"I'll continue to work outside of government to do everything I can to create a country for the first time that has equality of opportunity for young people wherever they are growing up."

Greening, who is seen as on the modernising wing of the Conservative party, was praised by the party’s leader in Scotland, Ruth Davidson, and backbencher, Heidi Allen.

Davidson said she was sorry to see the minister go on twitter.

Damian Hinds took the role of education secretary. Although he has a low profile in the party and media but, according to his government biography, he previously “spent 18 years working in the pubs, brewing and hotel industries, in Britain and abroad.”

Esther McVey became work and pensions secretary during the reshuffle. She has quickly bounced back into a cabinet-level job after losing her seat in 2015 and then parachuting into a safe constituency last year.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt also spent more than 90 minutes in Downing Street where he resisted May’s attempts to persuade him to switch to Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and allow Business Secretary Greg Clark to take on his role.

As a result, the planned move for Greg Clark did not go through, and he instead remained at the Department for Business , Energy and Industrial Strategy.

The Conservatives’ official Twitter feed also wrongly congratulated Chris Grayling for becoming party chair, only for Brandon Lewis to take the place. Grayling remained transport secretary.

Cabinet “big beasts” such as Boris Johnson, Philip Hammond and Amber Rudd all kept their jobs, which led to critics quoting the PM's widely mocked election campaign claim that "nothing has changed."

David Lidington was justice secretary for six months before being called on by Theresa May to steady the ship in the Cabinet Office. On paper, it looks like a sideways cabinet move, as Lidington gains the courtesy title of “chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.”

David Lidington replaces Damian Green as Minister for the Cabinet Office but is not made First Secretary of State.
David Lidington replaces Damian Green as Minister for the Cabinet Office but is not made First Secretary of State.

He replaced PM’s close ally Damian Green, who was dismissed as the Cabinet Office minister and de facto Prime Minister last month for misleading statements over pornography found on his office computer.

 

Who's In:

Damian Hinds, a junior DWP minister, is promoted to be the new Education Secretary.

Esther McVey becomes Work and Pensions Secretary.

David Lidington replaces Damian Green as Minister for the Cabinet Office but is not made First Secretary of State. 

David Gauke leaves the Department for Work and Pensions to become the new Justice Secretary, replacing David Lidington.

Brandon Lewis becomes Conservative Party chairman, moving from the Home Office where he was Immigration minister.

James Cleverly, a prominent backbencher, is the new Tory Party deputy chairman. 

Karen Bradley becomes Northern Ireland Secretary. She was the Culture Secretary.

Jeremy Hunt adds social care to his brief, becoming Health and Social Care Secretary.

Sajid Javid becomes Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government - adding housing to his job title.

Matthew Hancock replaces Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary. He has been a minister at DCMS.

Caroline Nokes joins the Cabinet as Immigration Minister

Claire Perry will also be able to attend the Cabinet as a new Business Minister.

 

Who's Out:

Sir Patrick McLoughlin resigns as Conservative Party chairman.

James Brokenshire steps down as Northern Ireland Secretary for health reasons.

Justine Greening resigns as Education Secretary.

 

Nothing has changed:

Brexit Secretary David Davis remains in his role.

Boris Johnson will keep his role as Foreign Secretary.

Greg Clark stays as Business Secretary.

David Mundell is appointed again as Scottish Secretary.

Chancellor Philip Hammond stays at the Treasury.

Penny Mordaunt remains in post as International Development Secretary.

Amber Rudd remains Home Secretary.

Gavin Williamson carries on as Defence Secretary

Liam Fox remain as International Trade Secretary.

Chris Grayling stays at the Department for Transport.

Environment Secretary Michael Gove also stays in his role.

Alun Cairns keeps his position as Secretary of State for Wales.

Baroness Evans stays as Leader of the House of Lords.

Jeremy Wright keeps his job as Attorney General

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