Support for second Brexit referendum ‘almost unanimous’ amongst EU leaders, Joseph Muscat says

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, speaking to the BBC, said EU leaders wanted the “almost impossible”, that a second vote on Brexit be held

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat and the leaders of the other 27 EU member states are in Salzburg for talks on the next stage of the Brexit process
Prime Minister Joseph Muscat and the leaders of the other 27 EU member states are in Salzburg for talks on the next stage of the Brexit process

There is “almost unanimous” agreement amongst European Union that another Brexit referendum should be held in Britain, Joseph Muscat has said.

Speaking on the BBC’s Today Programme, the Prime Minister said EU leaders wanted “the almost impossible” to happen, and that the UK held another vote on whether or not to the leave Union.

Muscat is currently in Salzburg with the leaders of the other 27 EU member states, where the next stage of the Brexit process is set to be considered.

"My experience so far within the context of the European Council is that, irrespective of one’s political allegiances, there is a lot of respect [for the Brexit decision],” Muscat noted.

"Having said that, there is a unanimous or almost unanimous point of view around the table that we would like the almost impossible to happen - that the UK has another referendum,” he said.

Most EU leaders “would welcome a situation where there is the possibility of the British people putting things into perspective, seeing what has been negotiated, seeing the options, and then deciding once and for all,” he added.

Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babiš appeared to support Muscat's views, saying he felt another vote on the matter could “help solve the [Brexit] problem”.

Babiš told the BBC he was “very unhappy” the UK would leave the EU, so it might be “be better to make another referendum, and maybe people could change their view”.

Theresa May: no second referendum

Theresa May, however, speaking outside the informal summit, said a Conservative government would not permit a second referendum on Brexit.

She emphasised that the British public would not be given another vote on the matter, in spite of increasing calls for this.

Amongst those urging for a new referendum was London mayor Sadiq Khan, who said in the weekend that the final deal should be subjected to a vote by the public.

 

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