As Europe burns, US confirms intention to withdraw from climate agreement

The Trump administration has not excluded re-engaging in talks if the terms were made more advantageous to the United States.

US President Donald Trump
US President Donald Trump

As much of Europe battles forest fires and sweltering temperatures, the US state department has issued its first written statement confirming that it will withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

But the Trump administration has not excluded re-engaging in talks if the terms were made more advantageous to the United States.

In a letter to the United Nations, the US state department said Washington would continue to participate in climate meetings during the withdrawal process. which is expected to take a minimum of three years.

In a statement, the department said “the United States supports a balanced approach to climate policy that lowers emissions while promoting economic growth and ensuring energy security,”

Donald Trump's announcement of his intention to withdraw from the Paris accord, on the grounds that the deal would have come at too great a cost to America in both jobs and revenue was met with universal condemnation.

Scientists list climate change as one of the largest threats to human health this century.

Two thirds of Europe's population is expected to be affected by heat waves, coastal flooding and other weather-related disasters, by the end of the 2000s.


 

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