Malta SPCA says islands’ zoos cannot give good quality of life to wild animals

MSPCA questions quality of life that captive wildlife can have 'in a country like Malta'

Remains of the Wildlife Park Malta, Mtahleb, following the fire on Tuesday (Photo: Facebook)
Remains of the Wildlife Park Malta, Mtahleb, following the fire on Tuesday (Photo: Facebook)

The Malta Society for the Protection and Care of Animals has called for better audits on Maltese zoos, in the aftermath of the fire that killed the animals inside Wildlife Park Malta of Mtahleb.

"We should learn from this unfortunate episode and that the competent authorities should perform the necessary audits to ensure that wellbeing, health and safety standards are maintained,” the organisation said.

Leopards Mrs Bagheera and Mr Buddy, who were killed in the fire in Mtahleb
Leopards Mrs Bagheera and Mr Buddy, who were killed in the fire in Mtahleb
Two lemurs, also killed in the blaze
Two lemurs, also killed in the blaze

The MSPCA said it is concerned with the growing reports of wild animals in so called private collections.  “MSPCA urges the authorities to monitor this and other operations to prevent further deterioration in Malta as wild animals, even in private collections, have made the news before for all the wrong reasons.”

Wildlife Park Malta, a licensed zoo, was hit by a fire on Tuesday early morning, which claimed the lives of many of their animals.

The MSPCA said it was saddened by the unnecessary death of the animals killed in the blaze, while animal lovers all over social media are expressing their anger that this happened.

“Several animals have had to be displaced as their enclosures are no longer safe or secure, while two leopards, three parrots, two lemurs, two monkeys and a squirrel monkey were less fortunate and died in the fire. While this nightmare unfolds MSPCA hopes that these animals are not further stressed by being kept in make-shift enclosures that weren't made for them or being sent to private collections in even worse conditions.”

MSPCA said that wild animals do not belong in captivity unless it is unsafe for them to be released. “MSPCA especially questions the quality of life captive wildlife can have in a country like Malta. Across the world zoos are turning their focus to education and conservation efforts.”

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