Rattling your inner self | Kill the Action

TEODOR RELJIC speaks to genre-hopping local act Kill the Action about the dynamics of their unique sound, the challenges local musicians face and what we can expect from their debut full-length album, Anti-Gravity, out from Bristol-based label Forbidden Musical Rites on February 19

The gap between man and machine: Local quartet Kill The Action prepare to launch their genre-hopping full length debut album, Anti-Gravity
The gap between man and machine: Local quartet Kill The Action prepare to launch their genre-hopping full length debut album, Anti-Gravity

How would you describe your sound to people who have never heard you – or of you – before?

It is definitely hard-hitting and intended to keep you on the edge of your seat. Big up-tempo beats provide a backbone for fat synth sounds, low frequencies intended to rattle your inner self, and a healthy dose of guitar sounds. Since we perform as a live band, the output is essentially our take on bridging the gap between our musical roots and the world of electronica… the inevitable gap between man and machine.

When did you first get together as a band, and what were some of the ways in which your sound began to shape itself in its earlier stages?

The band was formed around five years ago. Throughout the years we have experimented with various arrangements in an attempt at finding the right balance between different electronic influences and our wish to create something different.

Over the years, the band’s earlier ‘electro-rock’ approach has gained more of an electronic component and vibe to it.

This has, in turn, led to more focus being placed on the type of beats used, on the careful construction of hooks and breakdowns, as well as on creating a unique vibe and attitude.

(Left to right) Andre Portelli, Mark Zammit, Simon Deguara and Herman Spiteri
(Left to right) Andre Portelli, Mark Zammit, Simon Deguara and Herman Spiteri

What excites you the most about your upcoming debut full length album, Anti-Gravity, and how would you say it differs from your 2018 EP release, For All You People?

‘Anti-Gravity’ will be released on February 9 by Forbidden Musical Rites, a Spanish record label based in Bristol (UK).

This has shaped our approach towards the promotion and marketing of the album, whilst also providing an opportunity to test the waters on an international level.

Hopefully, this will also pave the way for the next step in the band’s evolution.

Whereas our EP, ‘For All You People’ was based on a more rock-oriented approach, the core of ‘Anti-Gravity’ is more electronic, dynamic and up-tempo, with tighter rhythm sections, more ‘low-end’, and a greater dose of Drum & Bass.

This shift has led us to experiment with an approach to song-writing which is more production-based at the very outset of the development of a particular concept, and, therefore, less reminiscent of a traditional approach which one would expect from a four-piece electro-rock band.   

How do you hope that the album will be received locally – and hopefully, internationally – given that you’ve seriously dialed up the dance and electronica elements this time around?

We have already received very positive feedback on an international level, particularly from members of the Drum & Bass community. The signing of a record deal obviously also helped to expand our reach, both in terms of promotion, as well as in terms of gaining greater insight into the workings of the underground music industry. The greater emphasis placed on the electronic aspect of the band’s sound has also steered our focus and attention on the creation of material which is more rhythm and groove-oriented and which is intended to get you out of your seat and onto the dance floor.

‘Anti-Gravity’ will be released on February 9 by Forbidden Musical Rites, a Spanish record label based in Bristol
‘Anti-Gravity’ will be released on February 9 by Forbidden Musical Rites, a Spanish record label based in Bristol

What do you make of the local musical scene? What would you change about it?

It is no secret that the last few years have seen an even more rapid decline in the number of venues which are equipped to host live performances. A number of other smaller venues are equipped for the basic needs of ‘plug-and-play’ bands, but not for the needs of bands which require a more complex set-up or which focus on creating an audio-visual experience.

Local FM radio stations are, as ever, still focused on regurgitating the same formula and type of music which will, most probably, not even be considered to have contributed or formed part of this era’s pop culture. It is a shame that this has contributed to an overall perception that local artists who dare to sound different from mainstream artists have no place on the local airwaves.

What’s next for you?

We are currently hard at work on promoting the commercial release of ‘Anti-Gravity’ and on planning a number of local gigs to showcase the album’s content in a live setting. We are also looking into the possibility of performing a number of gigs abroad later on this year and we will be releasing more audio-visual content from the album in the coming months.

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