Eight IVF cycles at Mater Dei used frozen embryos

The IVF law was amended last year to enable doctors to freeze embryos for later use by the prospective mother

The law regulating IVF was changed last year to allow the freezing of embryos as part of the treatment
The law regulating IVF was changed last year to allow the freezing of embryos as part of the treatment

Eight in-vitro fertilisation cycles carried out at Mater Dei Hospital used frozen embryos, information tabled in Parliament shows.

The law regulating IVF was changed last year to allow the freezing of embryos as part of the treatment offered to women.

Prior to the change, embryo freezing was against the law and only permitted in extreme cases where fertilised eggs could not be transferred to the woman.

Health Minister Chris Fearne told Parliament on Wednesday that eight of the 862 IVF cycles carried out at Mater Dei since 2015 used frozen embryos.

He was answering a parliamentary question by Labour Whip Byron Camilleri.

Fearne said that from the 862 cycles, 179 babies were born, giving a success rate of 21%. The born babies were 99 girls and 80 boys.

Another seven couples who underwent IVF treatment at the public hospital are awaiting a child in 2020.

EXPLAINER: How the IVF law changed in 2018 

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