Chaotic scenes in Budapest as refugees are forced off a train at a refugee camp

European leaders divided over how to deal with migration crisis

Syrian refugees clamber onto trains after two-day stand-off hoping to make it to the Austrian border
Syrian refugees clamber onto trains after two-day stand-off hoping to make it to the Austrian border
German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande call for permanent burden distribution system among EU member states
German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande call for permanent burden distribution system among EU member states

International media report that scuffles have broken out west of the Hungarian capital, Budapest, after police tried to force migrants off a train at a refugee camp. The police have ordered journalists from the scene at Bicske, declaring it an "operation zone".

Earlier on Thursday, migrants who had been camped outside Budapest's Keleti railway station surged on to the platforms as soon as police withdrew after a two day stand-off. International services were suspended at Budapest's station but hundreds crammed on to the first train hoping it would take them to the Austrian border, from where they could proceed to Germany.

However, reports show that the train stopped at the Hungarian town of Bicske about 40km west of Budapest, which hosts a major refugee camp, where police lined the platforms. Some of the migrants at first left the train but then forced their way back upon realising where the authorities wanted them to go.

They fear that registering at the camp will make it harder for them to seek asylum in Germany and other countries.

The number of migrants entering Europe has reached record levels this year with Germany expecting to take in 800, 000 asylum seekers - four times last year's total. The rise in numbers has created tension and disagreement over EU migration policy.

European leaders met in Brussels earlier today to try and find a solution to the crisis. The meeting was characterized with sharp disagreements as Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban described the situation as a "German problem" given that Germany was the asylum seekers’ preferred destination.

European Council President Donald Tusk said however that at least 100,000 refugees should be distributed across EU states, while French and German leaders Francois Hollande and Angela Merkel have repeated calls for a permanent and mandatory system to accept asylum seekers into the EU.

During a tense press conference with European Parliament President Martin Schulz, Orban, who heads the anti-immigration Fidesz party, said Hungarians "were full of fear because they see that the European leaders... are not able to control the situation".

"Nobody would like to stay in Hungary, neither in Slovakia nor Poland nor Estonia. All of them would like to go to Germany. Our job is only to register them," he said.

Tusk took Orban to task for saying in a newspaper interview that Hungary was being "overrun" with refugees who threatened to undermine Europe's Christian roots.

"Referring to Christianity in a public debate on migration must mean in the first place the readiness to show solidarity and sacrifice," he said.

Tusk's call for at least 100,000 asylum seekers to be redistributed across EU states is a sharp increase on a previous European Commission target of 40,000.

The human cost of the crisis was also put into sharp focus on Wednesday when five children were among 12 migrants who drowned in Turkish waters while trying to reach Greece, and images of the washed-up body of three-year-old Aylan Kurdi, who died alongside his mother and five-year-old brother, circulated all over social media earlier today.

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