Attard council and ERA object to Pit Stop cafeteria

The Attard local council and the Environment and Resources Authority are opposing a two-storey cafeteria adjacent to the Pit Stop fuel station in Attard

ERA warned that the erection of a cafeteria would cause the loss of rural character of the area and set a pretext for further pressures on the site
ERA warned that the erection of a cafeteria would cause the loss of rural character of the area and set a pretext for further pressures on the site

The Attard local council and the Environment and Resources Authority are opposing a two-storey cafeteria adjacent to the Pit Stop fuel station in Attard, that would abut on the boundary of the mental health hospital Mount Carmel.

The development, proposed by the owners of the petrol station, would be set on a 220sq.m footprint that includes a 110sq.m outdoor area and parking facilities on a 1,500sq.m piece of land.

The Attard council described the café as an “unjustifiable sprawl into existing ODZ [outside development zones]” that would further impinge on the rural character of the area. It also warned that the proposal will increase air and noise pollution in the area.

The ERA said the proposal was one of “significant environmental concern” and added that it would protrude beyond the existing permitted footprint into undeveloped ODZ land; committing an additional area of around 1,500sq.m.

It objected to the proposed location of the parking areas within an agricultural field which would result in further uptake of rural land and removal of soil from the site.

It said the proposal was “inappropriate” as such commercial development should be restricted within the development zone.

ERA warned that the erection of a cafeteria would cause the loss of rural character of the area and set a pretext for further pressures on the site.

The ODZ petrol station was originally approved in 2006 despite a clear recommendation of the case officer against its approval.

In March 2017, the PA approved an application to construct an additional floor over the petrol station’s shop to cater for 100sq.m of offices. Originally the application also included a restaurant but this was later omitted.

The application was approved by the PA’s planning commission despite the contrary advice of the case officer, who argued that there was enough space at ground level to cater for the offices.

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