European Parliament backs Miriam Dalli’s CO2 emissions deal

Commissioner for climate action Miguel Arias Cañete praised the Labour MEP for her ‘leadership on a challenging file’

The European Parliament gave the final go-ahead on Wednesday for an ambitious target to reduce EU emissions for new cars by 2030
The European Parliament gave the final go-ahead on Wednesday for an ambitious target to reduce EU emissions for new cars by 2030

The European Parliament has overwhelmingly backed the draft legislation to reduce emissions for new cars and vans, as negotiated by Labour MEP Miriam Dalli. MEPs backed the deal with 561 votes in favour and 63 against.

This is the final vote by the European Parliament endorsing the legislation, with the draft become law once the Council endorsees the same text.

The proposal will see a 37.5% emissions reduction target for new cars and vans by 2030.

Speaking during Tuesday’s debate, European Commissioner for Climate Action and Energy Miguel Arias Cañete praised the work carried out by the Maltese MEP.

“I’d like to be here today as we bring to a successful conclusion the legislation setting new standards for cars and vans for the period post-2020. This has been possible thanks to the excellent work and constructive efforts of negotiators from both institutions,” Cañete said, referring to both the European Parliament and the Commission.

“In particular, I would like to warmly thank the rapporteur Miriam Dalli for her leadership on this challenging file. It required a lot of dedication from her side to bring together the different views and to lead successfully the negotiations.”

Other MEPs who took the floor also commended Dalli on her work on the controversial legislation, which was opposed by many, including the car lobby.

Fully embracing the concerns of trade unions, the legislation demands the European Commission to assess the possibility of creating a fund for a just transition. Amongst other, the legislation also introduces an obligation for the European Commission to monitor and report fuel consumption meter data to ensure that what is tested in the laboratory and what is actually emitted on the roads is not difference.

“This is a step forward to ensure that Europe remains ahead of the curve when it comes to zero- and low-emission vehicles’ technology instead of depending on imports. I am convinced that this transition can ensure the competitiveness of the automotive industry,” Dalli said.

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