Shared transport could reduce delays on Birkirkara bypass by up to 30%

A recent study carried out in collaboration with Project Aegle found that a shared transport system could reduce traffic by 20 to 30%

It is estimated that if 40 to 50% of University students and employees take up shared transport, the delay on the road is reduced by 20 to 30%
It is estimated that if 40 to 50% of University students and employees take up shared transport, the delay on the road is reduced by 20 to 30%

Widespread use of shared transport systems could reduce delays on Triq Dun Karm in Birkirkara by 20 to 30%, according to a recent study conducted by Project Aegle.

The study carried out by Professors Adrian Muscat and Maria Attard in partnership with Project Aegle showed there is a correlation between the levels of academic activity at the University of Malta and the delay experienced on Triq Dun Karm during rush hours.  

GPS data showed that traffic to the University is characterized by prolonged periods of low, medium, and high counts which point to seasonal variations in delays experienced on Triq Dun Karm. From the data it has been estimated that if 40 to 50% of University students and employees take up shared transport, the delay on roads would be reduced by 20 to 30% depending on the transport provided.  

“Looking at those numbers confirms studies we have conducted already earlier this year. It is all about thinking about alternatives to a single occupied vehicle. Key is that we change our mind-set and are prepared to try out new ways of mobility,” said Nicoletta Moss, Project Manager of Project Aegle.

According to the NGO the results of the study, have brought about the provision of a shared transport system that would provide services to and from the university and nearby businesses to towns along the west of the university.  

Furthermore, a 2016 study by the two University of Malta academics demonstrated the feasibility of an "on-line automated flexible demand responsive transport system" to service the University community.

“The implementation of such a system would result in mitigating congestion on Triq Dun Karm, reduce noise and improve air quality.  Needless to say the same concept may be applicable to commuters in adjacent large-scale activities around the Tal-Qroqq, Mater Dei, Swatar and San Gwann industrial area or along other corridors in the island’s urban areas.”

The project Aegle Foundation was launched in 2016, as a non-profit initiative which aims to advance the quality of life in Malta through improved mobility.

“Today, the Maltese Islands face a great challenge in form of traffic congestion and parking problems. These cause economic losses in the hundreds of millions, as well as a range of preventable health problems. Set up by the Debono Group, the projects brings together a mix of collaborators hailing from academia, business and civil society at large. Project Aegle believes that solid research, education, innovative technologies and ideas are the way forward.”

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