Mizzi cedes constitutional case over Panama inquiry

A court of Appeals yesterday threw out an order for an inquiry to be held into suspicions of money laundering stemming from the Panama Papers leak

Tourism Minister Konrad Mizzi has dropped a constitutional case he had filed claiming a breach of his fundamental human rights
Tourism Minister Konrad Mizzi has dropped a constitutional case he had filed claiming a breach of his fundamental human rights

Tourism Minister Konrad Mizzi has formally dropped a constitutional case he had filed, claiming that his fundamental rights had been breached during the judicial process which began after a request for a magisterial inquiry was made by former Opposition Leader Simon Busuttil following the revelations in the Panama Papers.

Mizzi’s constitutional application had led to a request by Busuttil and MEP David Casa to be allowed to intervene in the suit.

Yet when the case was due to continue on Wednesday morning, the applicant’s lawyers - the minister was not present in court - informed the court that the he was presenting a note to formally cede the case in view of yesterday’s decree by the Criminal Court in which Mr Justice Giovanni Grixti overturned an earlier decision by a court of Magistrates, green-lighting a magisterial inquiry against seven high-profile personalities, of which Mizzi was one.

In view of this formal declaration by the Minister’s lawyers, Mr Justice Robert Mangion upheld the request for cession of the constitutional proceedings, closing the case.

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