16th century chapel to be restored

The Planning Authority, which approved the restoration works, has assured the work will be carried out in accordance with an approved restoration method statement and monitored by its conservation officers

The late medieval chapel is rectangular in plan and has a rather cubic external form and unpretentious bleak exterior, typically of Maltese vernacular architecture
The late medieval chapel is rectangular in plan and has a rather cubic external form and unpretentious bleak exterior, typically of Maltese vernacular architecture

The chapel dedicated to San Gwann tal-Għargħar, in San Gwann, is to undergo restoration to the external facade, roof and parvis, including the removal of cement renders and accumulated biological dirt, repair work to minor damages and also address the deterioration of certain stones.

The chapel is made up of a small parvis in its front, two stone water spouts on either side, and a small doorway facing west with a square clerestory window.

Inside, the chapel has four arches supporting a double pitched roof as well as a bell cot above the window. Adjoining this chapel is a small sacristy with a star-shaped air vent at the front.

The Planning Authority drew attention to a small marble plaque near the door of the chapel with an abbreviated inscription warning criminals that the chapel did not give immunity from being apprehended by the authorities.

According to the Planning Authority, the chapel was built by a private family in 1546, but was reportedly later abandoned until Bishop Balaguer profaned it in 1659. However, it was reopened again in 1672.

The chapel is presently used by the organisation MUSEUM for teachings in catholic catechism.

The Chapel is a Grade 1 protected building and was scheduled by the Authority in 1994. 

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